Tagged: Thailand car hire

Quick Guide To Thailand

Thailand is possibly the most-visited country in south-east Asia. The irresistible combination of fine beaches, ancient monuments and civilisations and renowned cuisine makes a holiday here an absolute must.

Where is it?

Thailand is in south-east Asia, bordering Malaysia to the south, Myanmar (Burma) to the north, and Cambodia and Laos to the east. It benefits from coastal stretches both in the Indian Ocean and the Gulf of Thailand.

Where can I stay?

Thailand is a popular country to visit – Bangkok is a 24-hour city with hotels to match whilst smaller cities and coastal resorts have also made the most of the constant tourist trade. Travellers are becoming more sophisticated, however, which has resulted in a number of boutique hotels opening to cater for the discerning guest. For those who love the beach, try the luxury of Aleenta; a small, private beach hotel which houses just 17 suites and 2 private villas. With unspoilt beach on your doorstep, an infinity pool and romantic breakfast and dinner settings, beach-life rarely gets better. Alternatively, go for the lights and sounds of Bangkok, where you could stay at the Ibrik City; a very chic hotel right in the middle of the business district and next to the famous “Blue Elephant” cooking school. With just three rooms, this is a modern yet homely hotel and great transport connections mean that this boutique hotel is the ideal base for days and nights in Bangkok.

What can I see?

Thailand is renowned for its ancient monuments, stupas and temples. From the sheer architectural delight of the Phimai Temple, a Hindu/Buddhist temple, to the ancient stupas in the Sukothai Historical Park, there’s much to learn about civilisations hundreds and thousands of years old and the way they affect the people of Thailand today. Don’t miss the busy and colourful markets either, and make sure that you spend time sampling the fabulous food for which Thailand is so well known. Venture away from the beaches to the rivers and mountains of Thailand’s interior to sample a simpler way of life, or take in the energy of Bangkok with a city visit.

How do I get around?

You can hire a car to get around Thailand, but it may be easier to take the train. Bangkok city is serviced by a Sky train and boat service, so there’s no need for any other transport to get you around. Outside Bangkok and closer to the coast, use the buses and trains to get about. The trains may be slower than you’re used to, but they’re comfortable. On the other hand, the buses are fast and furious, but they are cheap and air-conditioned.

Kanchanaburi

Kanchanaburi is the one province that has varieties of natural resources in Thailand. Kanchanaburi is Thailand ’s third largest province,covers an area approximately 19,473 square kilometers and it far from Bangkok about 129 kilometers. Kanchanaburi has many tourist attractions including the word-famous bridge over The river kwae and several well known waterfalls, caves, forests, rivers and dam. Therefore, tourist can have many kind of activity at Kanchanaburi such as mountain biking, rafting, fishing, play golf, junkle trekking and living in bamboo raft. Moreover, you will visit the notorious Dead Railway and the Bridge on the River Khwae, one of the famous World War II.

Kanchanaburi consist of 13 districts(Amphoe) which Amphoe Muang, Amphoe Bophloi, Amphoe Lao Khwan, Amphoe Phanom Thuan, Amphoe Sai Yok, Amphoe Sangkhla Buri,, Amphoe Si Sawat, Amphoe Tha Maka, Amphoe Tha Muang, Amphoe Thong Pha Phum, Amphoe Dan Makham Tia, Amphoe Nong Pru, Amphoe Huai Kra Chao.

Many kind of transports that you can use to go there one of the most convenience is by car in case of you have a car or hire cars. So start with buy a map from book shop or traveler information at the airport. However, I think most of tourist like to travel by bus. If you prefer t o use bus you can go to Kanchanaburi by take a bus at Southern Bus Terminal, it take you around one and a half hour to arrive there. Air-conditioned buses to Kanchanaburi leave the Southern Bus Terminal twice per hour all day until 9 p.m. return buses run on the same schedule. Sometimes if you would like to learn way of Thais’ life and you have a lot of times you can go to Kanchanaburi by trains. Trains to Kanchanaburi leave Thon Buri Station at 7:50 a.m.and 1:40 p.m. daily. Return trains leave Kanchanaburi Station at 7:30 a.m. and 3:20 p.m. It take about four and a half hour to be there. You can get more information about Trains schedule at www.railway.co.th. There are also tourist minibuses directly to/from Khao San Road, departing Kanchanaburi at 13:30 and 18:30. At Kanchanaburi you can use songthaews (converted pickups) for transportation also taxi, motorbike and tuk-tuks are available.

New Treats on Offer in Thailand

Visitors to Thailand can take advantage of a feast of new offerings for 2007-08, including new restaurants, nightclubs, cafes, hotels and shopping centres.

Highlights of the 2007-08 tourist season include Breeze, a new alfresco fine-dining restaurant from Lebua on the 51st and 52nd floors of the sky-scraping State Tower in Bangkok, 70′s disco funk nightclub Superfly, a private sea plane service between islands surrounding Phuket in the Andaman Sea and the upscale Maze Cafe in Chiang Mai city.

Jungceylon, a vast new shopping and entertainment complex at Patong Beach, Phuket, is expected to attract hordes of holidaymakers, with more than 200 local and international brand shops, cinemas, a fully-equipped sports zone, night entertainment venues, restaurants and a Thai handicraft centre.

Thailand offers travellers high quality, value-for-money, products and services, while lesser-known resorts such as Koh Yao, Trang, Koh Chang, Koh Racha and Khao Lak are becoming increasingly popular, with a raft of new boutique offerings and must see attractions opening in 2007.

With something to offer all travellers, from sunshine, paradise beaches, spas and scuba diving, to shopping, trekking and festivals, Thailand is fast becoming one of the most popular destinations for year round travel.

If you are planning to fly over, Traveljigsaw offer great deals on rental cars at the airport. Boo konline to save up to 10%!

What to Do and See in the Kingdom of Cambodia

This cool little country is located in South East Asia, in the region known as Indochina. It is bordered by Thailand, Laos and Vietnam. There is lots to see and do, and it will cost you a fraction of what it would tripping around in the west. So come on a journey of discovery.

The capital is a frenetic city called Phnom Penh, which is easy to get to from the major regional airports like Bangkok, Kuala Lumpur, Ho Chi Min City or Singapore. While Phnom Penh has some curious charm of its own, like a lot of capital cities it performs better as a gateway than as a destination.

The two areas I would like to talk to you about lie in the north and south west of this nation respectively. Up north sits one of the seven wonders of the world, the Ankor Wat temple complex. This ancient marvel is breathtaking and justifiably on that well known list of 100 things to do or see before you die. To quote a recent visitor, I expected a pile of old rocks, but I got a powerful significant experience instead. It is a massive site, far bigger than most first time visitors imagine, and can easily take three days to walk around. Ankor Wat is situated adjacent to the northern regional town of Siem Reap, which is a one hour flight or a six hour road trip from Phnom Penh. Siem Reap can also be reached by air or road from Bangkok in neighboring Thailand.

The second place I want to tell you about is the seaside town of Sihanoukville. Also a regional town, Sihanoukville lies on the edge of the Gulf of Thailand, about three to fours hours from Phnom Penh down a pretty good sealed road. Close your eyes and picture white sand and turquoise water and you have pretty well visualized the beaches of Sihanoukville. Hey do not go packing your surfboard, the waters of the gulf are invariably calm and waves seldom exceed knee height. Put these cool beaches together with really low cost, and you will see why this is such an alluring and desirable place to visit. So lets look at how inexpensively you can spend say a week in this part of the world.

International flights have either hovered at the same price or have fallen noticeably over the past few years. So have a look on the net and you will possibly be pleasantly surprised at the cost of getting to Cambodia. Once you are at the airport, a thirty day tourist visa will cost you $20 usd. For $35 or so you can hire a car with driver to bring you the 235 kilometers to town, or spend about $7 for a seat on a bus instead.

Of course you will need somewhere nice to stay. There is a wide variety of accommodation on offer in town, everything from a mattress above a bar to a five star resort with all the trimmings. As a guide, an air conditioned room here with a hot shower, cable TV and a fridge will cost you around $15 per night! Food and drink is also wonderfully cheap with a tasty meal for around $3 and a cold beer for $1 a can.

Put all these advantages together and I trust you will agree that Cambodia is an as yet undiscovered gem, just waiting for you to come over and unwind.

KRABI – The Emerald of the East

KRABI – The Emerald of the East

They say that Hawaii is the Emerald of West and Krabi of the east. Welcome to travelonguide.com , where we are going to explore the scenic and untouched beaches of Krabi. If you are a honeymoon trip to the Far – East, then make sure that you to add Krabi in your itinerary, and we suggest that Krabi should be in the top 3 slots.

Krabi is a small town in Thailand which is based on the banks of river Krabi, very close to the river mouth which opens in the Andaman Sea. When you are at Krabi you have a great choice of activities like Snorkeling, Scuba Diving, Kayaking etc. And if you are one of those who love adventure then the lush green jungles, provide the perfect ambience. Vast areas of Krabi are a part of the natural reserve, and Elephant Trekking could be the best option to explore it. Did you know that to explore the islands around Krabi one would require more than a year.

The Phi Phi islands, Koh Lanta, Klong Muang Beach & Railey beach are amongst the most popular tourist destinations in Krabi. Ao Nang is the most developed beach in Krabi where you could find many beach resorts and hotels. One could stay on this beach and easily explore the nearby islands.

Krabi has 2 predominant seasons, one called the summer and the other Rainy. From January to April it’s the summer season and from May till December it’s the Rainy Season. The months of May until July are pretty comfortable and raining most in the evenings. Day time it could be cloudy, but overall the weather is pleasant. April could be the best season as you might witness lots of sun along with some rains, which could be a mixture of hot and cold. Ideally the temperature is Krabi ranges from 16.9 degrees to 7.3 degrees.

Getting to Krabi is not so difficult. If you are on a backpacker journey then you could take a train from Hualamphong Railway Station in Bangkok until Sakhon Si Thammarat and then take a bus or taxi until Krabi, which is a very scenic route. If you plan to travel by road then from Bangkok it’s approximately 900 kms and from Phuket it is approx 4 hours drive. Take the hourly Bus service from Phuket, which is so convenient and comfortable. You could also rent a car, but make sure that the car you hire is insured. If you are in Phuket, then you could also take a Boat ride until Phi Phi Islands then take a taxi until Krabi.

Shopping is also an activity in Krabi, and will indeed be a pleasurable experience for anyone. The markets of Krabi offer beautiful handicrafts, sarongs & silk scarves at very reasonable rates. Make sure that you bargain on every purchase, since most of the times the prices are doubled. Since Thailand is famous for clothing, you will get some very cheap but really fashionable clothing in every city of Thailand. Gem stones and antiques are also found in abundance. Don’t forget to purchase some orchids, for which Thailand is so famous. They are nicely packed with a small water container to make sure that the Orchids reach your home safely, whatever you shop in Thailand and where ever you shop, make sure you bargain.

So don’t think, just pack your bags and head to Krabi. We hope you found this small article about Krabi as interesting as Krabi itself is and don’t forget to log onto our site www.travelonguide.com to know more about some of the best exotic locations of the world.

Thailand’s Unrest: Packing Strategies For The Coup Near You

A funny thing happened on the way to my closet. This unforgettable journey from my shower confirmed an age old theory: a lot can happen in fifteen feet.

One night earlier I’d switched on the news to see civil unrest in Budapest, Hungary. My sister August was just there, I thought. Grand old buildings towered behind burning cars. As many do, I wondered: what is wrong with the world? Some of these countries…

At the time, there was no physical sensation caused by my foot being put in my mouth. I was oblivious to its presence. Fast forward 24 hours and enter my studio apartment in Chiang Mai, Thailand.

I pulled the towel from my wet hair as the newscaster spoke: “Another country is in turmoil tonight.” Ho hum, here we go again. Now, where are my pajamas? As I stepped past the television, her words rang out: “Tanks have entered Bangkok in a reported coup attempt.”

You know those moments in life when the space-time continuum warps around you? Everything freezes, yet your mind processes over three million random thoughts. That’s where I stood. Only then did I begin to notice my foot lodged deep in my mouth. In the .25 seconds it took to take one step backwards and wrench my head to the right, I had all the following thoughts.

That newscaster mis-spoke. Learn your job!

She means Hungry.

Buy a map.

What!

Mom’s gonna freak.

Wait, I’m 40

Mom’s gonna freak.

My mind is getting even for the Budapest comments. I deserved that.

What did she really say?

Eek! What do I do?

Pack.

No. Don’t pack.

Stay calm.

Pack.

I own way too much stuff!

I’m not breathing.

Perched on the end of the bed, I watch three channels simultaneously for well over an hour. I resolved to take the coup in stride. But! Maybe I’d pack one bag. It would be a ‘just in case’ bag. The essentials a person would need if a quick exit should be close at hand. Of course, I’d sleep fully dressed in running shoes. Okay, I made that last part up. (My running shoes are in my gym locker.)

Then came slow motion. My eyes panned the room. Books, dishes, bedding, electronics, enough inventory for a small camera shop and clothes, lots of clothes—despite my vow, I had nested. How had this happened?

It was not the first time I had contemplated moving my small household. I had always planned on relocating to Southern Thailand in the spring. It wasn’t even the first time this week I realized extra stuff had to go. Just days before Thailand had suddenly tightened its tourism visa laws. Tens of thousands of other long-term travelers, such as myself, must be out of the country in ninety days. We can not reenter for three months. Now this.

The coup gave me a whole new perspective. I had been worried I needed to buy another suitcase to move my precious inane possessions. In my panic, I grabbed just important things. Money, my laptop, camera body & one lens, debit cards, IDs, a couple changes of clothes and three packs of dry noodles. My backpack was only ½ full. I panned the room again.

Sleep prevailed. Perspective had returned. In the morning I had school and simply dumped my bag on the floor in a quest for missing underwear. After all, I’m in Chiang Mai, not Bangkok. But, my unpacked state was not to be.

At school, my teacher was visibly shaken. She’d seen soldiers on her way through town. They stood at the closed public schools, hospitals and local businesses. Tanks lined the Super Highway. They are in Chiang Mai.

Half the students had not shown up, others had no sleep. In my mind, I packed again. In my class, I absorbed nothing. None of us are any wiser for having been there. Strategies changed. I had time to organize. My ‘just in case’ bag was augmented.

On the way, home I stopped at the mall and purchased the most brilliantly blue suitcase ever seen from space. No doubt, right now, that female space tourist is looking toward Asia and reaching for sunglasses. Alas, it was half price.

Normally bustling, the mall ambiance was semi-dormant. Department store sales reps stood idle. And, I, their only customer, was buying a suitcase to leave. This was a likely sign of things to come for Thailand’s economy.

I walked away feeling as though I was carrying a scarlet letter— a big blue scarlet letter. It said, “T” for traitor. It screamed “C” for chicken. I’d have traded all my limited Thai vocabulary to know the phrase for ‘just in case’. The glow from my suitcase could not be hidden. Shame set in. Stepping out into the rain, I resolved not to pack a single thing.

And, the beat goes on. Arriving home, I turned on the tele and listened. The Northern Borders with Laos and Myanmar have been sealed. Borders! Sealed? Laos! That was my imagined escape route. The rollercoaster continues. As I write this, it’s been less than twenty-four hours since the first reports of tanks in Bangkok. I write and I ponder. Will the coup affect the airline’s baggage limits? How much can I pack?

Thailand Wilderness Adventure

Thailand has always held a special place in my heart. I first travelled there in 1991, a wide eyed kid wet behind the ears with a bucket shop one way ticket to Bangkok. My grand plans of a short beach break before heading down to the east coast of Australia joining the 1000’s of Pommie pilgrims earning a right of passage didn’t exactly go to plan. I left Thailand eleven months later to return home penniless, emancipated and full of great stories, which my friends soon got bored with.

I returned a few times mainly to Bangkok and Koh Samui happy to be back in the land of smiles but feeling slightly disappointed at all the changes. The old story of development being good for the locals but not good for my sense of adventure. That didn’t deter me from joining the Imaginative Travellers Wilderness Adventure two years ago.

Arriving in Bangkok this time was different. I had a hotel booked so no lugging my pack in Bangkok’s suffocating mixture of exhaust fumes, heat and humidity looking for a clean bed. I had a group to meet too, this was also good, eating Pad Thai on your own looking for a fellow traveller to strike a conversation with can be hard work. There were 10 of us, a mix of Poms, Aussies, a Canadian, an American and a South African. We all met for dinner and shortly after my first Thai beer I knew this would be a fun trip

Bangkok to me means food and shopping and the best place to find both is the Chata Chuk weekend market. I headed there with belly empty and wallet full destined to reverse the two. The market is huge, really huge, 35 acres of cheap goodies huge and sells everything from furniture to genuine fake designer clothes. The street food is fantastic but remember the Thai’s like it hot. I left my shopping with the hotel to keep safe as I would be returning there once I finished the trip.

Off to Chiang Mai on the overnight train. I like travelling like this, sleeping while moving makes sense to me and the train is clean, functional, safe and fine. I think Chiang Mai is the perfect place to escape hectic Bangkok. It’s a peaceful, happy place and that reflects in the locals. Sight seeing will take you to the Wat Pratat Doi Suthep temple – stunning and golden on a sunny day. The next stage of the trip was trekking in the surrounding jungle, I decided I needed a massage before we set off.

A trek in the hills of Northern Thailand is a chance to escape everyday life and clear your head. The going is not too difficult for someone with fairly good fitness although if it rains the mud can be tricky. I was enjoying my own head space when we arrived at the first village of wooden homes, pecking chickens and lots of smiles, basic but I couldn’t think of anywhere else I would rather have been. Chan, our guide, was a local from a neighbouring village and before long he had us divided amongst our village hosts before the sun set and got too difficult for us city people to do anything without electric light. That night, with the noise of the surrounding jungle lying on a mattress roll on a bamboo floor, was maybe the most peaceful night’s sleep I have ever had.

The next day’s trek was shorter and we covered ground quicker, maybe we were getting used to the trekking but I think it was the excitement of the elephant ride to come that afternoon. Lunch was delicious but we were too busy watching the elephants wash in the river to notice. Elephants are brilliant creatures and being on one journeying deeper into the jungle is a fantastic experience.

The next morning Chan had us up early helping him and the village men build our rafts to take us down river to civilization. It is all part of the experience helping the guys and by helping I mean staying out of their way while they expertly craft our rafts. A serene float down to the nearest small town where our bus was waiting to take us to a hot shower and another massage.

We left Chiang Mai and headed back to Bangkok where we broke the journey up to the south with an over night stay in the city of angels.

I had heard a few good things about Khoa Sok national park, not too popular with tourists or backpackers alike due it not having a major bus stop. To get there you need to stop the bus by the 3rd banyan tree after 17th stream near the big hill and you will find a bakkie waiting to take you into the park. I’m glad we had a tour leader. The first night we slept with the birds in tree houses the second and third we stayed in raft houses on a man made dam. It is a truly beautiful area and a few of us spent the days swimming in waterfalls, flooded caves, kayaking and hiking and some of just sat back and took it all in.

How to finish this Thailand trip? On the beach of course. The islands around Krabi are what we visualize when we think of a Thai beach and they do not disappoint. The Thai’s have a word called sabai, loosely translated it means an inner happiness and contentment. I woke one afternoon from a napping on the beach and understood exactly what sabai means.

This trip can be found on the Thailand section of Travel Light

http://www.travellight.co.za/south_east_asia_tours/thailand_tours.htm

Spencer Neal has worked in adventure travel since 1997. His many adventures and passion for travel has led him to part own an online adventure travel agency Travel Light www.travellight.co.za specialising in world wide adventures for South Africans. You can contact him at spencer@travellight.co.za

Villas in Phuket – The Perfect Accommodation Choice for Seeking Ultimate Privacy

The biggest island in Thailand, Phuket is truly a pearl in the Andaman Sea. Located to the south west of the country, this island destination is about 850 kilometers south of the capital city, Bangkok. With roughly the size of Singapore, Phuket is credited to be the only island in Thailand with the status of a province.

As a tourist destination, Phuket presents a feast of attractions that range from incredible temples and interesting museums to historic monuments and ancient Sino-Portuguese mansions. Just few among many of the attractions in the area are Wat Chalong – the largest of its kind in the area, Phuket Jaw – the largest Chinese temple in the area, Thalang National Museum – with artifacts that throw light on the history of the region, Phuket Seashell Museum – which boasts of an amazing collection of seashells and fossils, and Heroin’s Monuments, which is dedicated to two sisters who led the army to the victory of the Battle of Thalang in 1785.

Despite these attractions, the much of Phuket’s glory lies on its magnificent beaches, which among many others, are Patong – perhaps the most popular of all beaches in the area; Karon, a beautiful beach located to the south of Patong; Kata and Kata Noi, which are tranquil beaches situated to the south of Karon; Bang Tao, an eight kilometers long beach whose surroundings is a perfect base for enjoying activities such as rock climbing, golf, and horse riding.

Kamala, a relaxed beach area perfect for families; Nai Harn; Rawai beach, whose area is packed with an array of restaurants and hotels; and Surin Beach, situated to the north of the Kamala beach. In short there are more than half dozen beaches in the area, and all of them are a mecca for enjoying a range of water sport activities from windsurfing, scuba diving, and jet skiing to boating, parasailing, deep sea fishing, and swimming.

In fact, Phuket has everything for a relaxed vacation in Thailand. From upscale hotels and resorts to apartments and condominium units, accommodation choices available in Phuket are truly endless. However, the most perfect accommodation choice for those seeking ultimate privacy and uniqueness is villas. It is also a great option for those vacationing large families or groups.

A villa is usually a single detached or free standing structure, and would be mostly located nearby beaches. Depending upon the preferences and budget of guests, a variety of villas are available in Phuket.

For those who can spend extravagantly for their Phuket vacation, one of the best accommodation choices would be luxury villas with relaxed one or two bedrooms, expansive living areas with entertainment facilities, fully equipped kitchens, and spacious garage areas.

When comes to amenities, this type of villa is complete with television with satellite connection, CD and DVD players, Wifi internet, personal safes, and direct dial telephones. Some of the luxury services even offer such facilities as salt water pool, private gardens, air conditioned bedrooms, daily maid services, and superb massage treatments.

There are special types of villas that are exclusively designed for newly weds and honeymooners. Apart from ordinary features, a honeymoon villas offer facilities such as wedding villa decoration, three-tiered wedding cakes, rejuvenating couples massages, complimentary daily fruit, private secluded sun deck and swimming pools, double Jacuzzi, services of highly professional Thai chefs, and much more. Likewise, for beach bums, Phuket has some excellent options in the form of sea front as well as beach access villas.

In most cases, these villas are replete with all high-end facilities such as living and dining areas providing spectacular views of outdoors, western style kitchens with electric oven and coffee pot, tastefully decorated bedrooms coupled with television and computer with internet connection and spacious bath areas. In addition, there are also a number of villas that are especially designed for westerners, such as European style villas. These types of villas usually feature fresco dining facilities, bedroom with antique beds, rooms with French doors, kitchens that are perfect for gourmet cooking, and covered parking areas.

Nowadays, many of the villa providers in the scenario provide services in the form of packages, covering airport transfers, facilities for sightseeing, rental cars, rental equipments for enjoying different water sport activities, and services of daily maid and gardener. There are also some service providers that render special discounts when you make bookings of a particular villa or during a stipulated time period.

Learning From Tribes Around The World, By Raw Food Festival Founder Happy Oasis

This interview is an excerpt from Kevin Gianni’s Raw Food Summit which can be found at http://rawsummitarchives.com. In this excerpt, Happy Oasis shares on living with tribes around the world and the insights she’s gleaned from these experiences.

Raw Food Summit Excerpt with Happy Oasis, the founder of The Raw Spirit Festival.

Kevin: Today, I have another incredible guest on the line. She has traveled all around the world, living with tribal societies and learned their healing techniques and most recently has been organizing a yearly raw event for like-minded people like you to gather and share the message which is called the Raw Spirit Fest. So today, I’d like to welcome Happy. Happy, how are you?

Happy: I am content beyond measure.

Kevin: Well, that is an awesome way to start this call. Let’s start by talking about who you are and let’s just give a little bit background and then we’ll get right into the details of what we want to talk about today.

Happy: Alright. Well, I’m the founder, the chief visionary officer of the Raw Spirit Festival which is the biggest raw, vegan, organic, eco-sustainable solution world peace festival on the planet.

Kevin: Wow. Listen, when we talked before this call when we you had mentioned you had been out traveling to different cultures in Southeast Asia, is that correct?

Happy: Well, throughout Asia, Central America, and Canada and about 30 countries I’ve lived in.

Kevin: Okay. And you have done some research and you’ve lived with some Tribes. Why don’t you start and just kind of tell us some of the things that you’ve done and some of the distinctions that you’ve gotten and I’ll ask you questions as we go.

Happy: For more than 10 years, I was adopted by a variety of tribes in Asia and as an adventure anthropologist living up high in the Himalayas, in the swamplands of Bangladesh, in the hinterlands of Thailand, in Burma and on the islands of Malaysia and Thailand and many other countries and in Australia and because I was so young and so keen to learn their ways, they basically adopted me.

I would live with them for months on end and learn their languages. One of the things that I learned from the Yogis who lived up high in the Himalayas is the power of water. Yogis advocate using water as their primary medicine not only as an enema but if somebody has a skin ailment or from disease skin or an insect bite or a cut, the prescribed technique is to put that body part under the bubbling- near-freezing- water for as long as the person can stand it repeatedly through the course of the day and it’s considered most powerful to do this at sunrise and sunset because there’s something about the interplay of solar radiation at those times that accentuates the power of very cold water and in fact, one of the practices that I do is baptism every morning if I can and every evening and throughout America, we can do this in around the planet, when we’re traveling we seek out the relatively pristine streams wherever we’re traveling and bathe in them instead of going to the motel aid or going to a public shower and it cleans the body, mind, and spirit and I’d love to ask you, when is the last time you watched the sunrise?

Kevin: It was a couple of days ago. We were away and I watched the sunrise.

Happy: Isn’t that beautiful?

Kevin: Yes.

Happy: Because I was thinking it’s summer right now and it’s such an important spiritual practice that the tribal people who I lived with did this every day. The word soul actually means sun as in solar radiation and a person who has a lot of soul has a lot of sunshine in their heart and the word sole as in only,had also come from the word sun because it was considered the only source of life and the one to who we give reverence.

An important part is getting back into the tribal way of thinking is to sleep alfresco on the earth to feel the rhythm of the body called the earth, to feel the magnetic radiation, to feel the love emanating from the earth and its daily nightly rhythm.

One other aspect of a natural way of living is to embrace the night, to embrace the darkness and to revere and to commune with the starlight and starlight could be our most overlooked nutritional deficiency. Another aspect of tribal living is vigorous exercise. Tribal people exercise at least two hours a day with sweat, with a racing heart, with deep-end, vigorous and loud respirations, and so all of these is part of the raw vegan lifestyle; stretching, growing a garden, growing sprouts as a beginning to a garden.

As we’re hitchhiking, we can eat wild food and so it’s really important as part of a daily sacrament to touch, to sniff and to gently ingest at least one wild plant wherever we are to literally get in touch with our ambiance, to literally let ourselves on a sunny little level commune with the ambiance, with the soil that’s right beneath our feet.

Kevin: So when you went to these areas, I mean how old were you and how did you get invited or how did you present yourself to these different cultures?

Happy: Well, I received a scholarship to study at Hobart Matriculation College in Tasmania when I was 16 and 17 and while I was there, part of the program was a work program to go out into the professional force and so I joined the Tasmanian Forest Service and I was the only apprentice there who was not part aboriginal.

The aboriginal leaders welcomed me into their forest service family and so I learned a lot of the ways from them and then I felt so at home with them, more than I had in fact in the English culture of Tasmania that I realized that there’s an enormous vast world of wisdom and since I was 12 years old, I had been cognizant of the fact that certain aspects of Christianity might have certain limitations at least on my mindset and I was seeking out wisdom.

My path, I call it adventure anthropology but it was actually the path of someone who was just thirsting and hungering for wisdom and so I went from tribe to tribe seeking out better ways in doing ways that are more, we call today eco-sustainable and more gentle and simple loving kindness and humor and spontaneity.

I would stay with one tribe and I would think, “This is it. I’m never leaving.” And then they will become victims of genocide. For example, I was in Bangladesh and the tribes that I was just leaving just to re – supply were attacked by the Bengali government.

There was another tribe I lived with on the border of Thailand and when I left their refugee camp one day, I came back the next day and they have been burnt to the ground and so had all of my friends with it, so I’ve been in one experience after another.

The Moken people who I lived with became virtual servants of the Thai Forest Service. The Thai Forest Service would pay the teenage girls for an entire day of sweeping the forest clean because it’s a jungle. They would get paid two bags of potato chips, the very small ones and they had to do it. They didn’t really have a choice.

They were also setup on reservations and they became the tourist attraction so they had to stay on this island and the Forest Service had them build certain buildings that they thought the tourists would like to see them in and then they were no longer allowed to go in their sailing canoes from island to island and experience their free lifestyle because before that, they used to go all the way to India almost every year through the Andaman Sea to fish and hunt and they have a very easy, beautiful, adventurous lifestyle.

What’s happening in a lot of the developing countries, and there’s a reason why it’s called developing because it’s developing into what we’ve developed into. That the tribal people are going through the same thing that our tribal people, our native people went through a hundred to two hundred years ago.

Kevin: Let’s pick a tribe and whatever one that you’re closest to or you were closest to, you know what is the daily activity? What do they eat? You said that everyone sleeps on the ground. I mean, what’s the activity? What do they do? What do they hunt? I mean, it’s so fascinating to me and I need to know.

Happy: Alright. Well, one of the people I lived with was the Khasi people and they’re pineapple farmers and so we would collect herbs everyday. They live deep in the forest and then they have this conical huts entirely comprised of mud and they were the cleanest mud huts imaginable. Everything was tidy. They had very few possessions, almost none. They have one little treasure chest full of their very few earthly possessions like an outfit of intricate lacy beauty each and otherwise, they wear very little and they live in a very simple life, in a very simple way and we would collect herbs early in the morning. We would offer prayers to the sunshine.

Kevin: What are the prayers about?

Happy: One translation could be which I have been saying for many years, “Oh divine sun, bearer of all life, giver of all beings, may you live forever, and may we live forever, at one with you so that we can make it homewards to you eternally. Oh, divine sun, bearer of all life, giver of all beings.” We would go up our little moles and it reminds me of the people who are like squirrels, like birds, like mountain lions, all these people they have different tribes, they happen to be different species live by the same religion. Let’s say it’s the religion of the sun, the religion of a natural rhythm, the breathing of day and night and fully feeling the breath of the season, living as close to the mother earth as possible and really feeling as if we are sleeping on the breasts of a mother every night.

A lot of these people I live with never wore shoes. They smile a lot. They radiate a smile like sunshine and not just in their eyes or in their smile but their whole body. They tend to be very affectionate, a lot of hugging, a lot of touching, a lot of massage, foot massage.

Part of our community here_ the Happy Oasis Raw Retreat which is a long-term raw vegetarian community of about 6 to 10 people at any given time. We’ve adopted these tribal ways of having a lot of freedom to do whatever we like. There’s no guru here. Everybody is self-actualizing continuously and sharing.

There’s just a lot of affection verbally, encouragement, communion, becoming intimate as much as we can, not necessarily as much physically as a group but more in a way of the heart through communication because communication because communication comes from the root of communion – commune and I realize that the only true communication is that in which our speaking and our listening results in this feeling of oneness.

How To Hire a Ghost Writer To Write Articles For Your Company Website Or Blog

Have you never needed an article and had writers block? You get stuck and just can’t seem to get your thoughts down on paper. Getting writers block happens to the best writers and if you’re in business and need extra content for your website or blog, hiring a ghost writer may be just the answer for you. Hiring a writer for your company articles makes good since if you’re too busy to write them yourself.

Many small companies the owner if the chief cook and bottle washer. To save money, you have to wear many hats to try to save money for your growing startup company. When a company becomes more established, the owner may find he just doesn’t have the time to sit down at his computer and take the time to crank out an article a few times a week. When you get to that point it in business it makes good sense to look to hire a good ghost writer to write articles for your company.

Hiring a ghost writer to write articles for your company isn’t very hard to do. Many article directories offer this service. If your business is very specialized, you may be more challenged to find someone who can intelligently write good fresh content for your website. In a case like this you may choose to try to use a service that specializes at doing this kind of service.

When hiring an article writer one thing good to look for is someone who has a lot of varied experience in many different fields. If you trying to write about car sales, look for a writer that has sales experience in closely related fields. Sometimes too good of a writer may alienate the customers audience if his vocabulary doesn’t match that of the reader. You may have to weed through several writers until you find someone who matches the style and experience of the company web owner.

Reading samples of past articles the author has written on varied subjects is a prerequisite to hiring a good writer for your company. Take your time by doing your research when you are looking for a potential candidate author for your blogs, newsletter or articles. See how closely some of the articles match what you want to hire them to write about.

You can use messaging services like MSN messenger to chat with your author if they reside in a different country then your own. Hiring oversea writers from countries like Thailand and India can save you money and you can get quality writers without the overhead involved with the cost of living of that in the west.

Many overseas companies have people you can hire for as little as $5 dollars an hour. Skilled content writers may be hundreds less per job then what writers in the west may charge. You want to make sure to check their work to make sure your getting quality at a fair price.

In summary, hiring a ghost writer may be the answer to carry out your message to your customers when the owner is too busy with other facets with running the business. Hiring a good writer isn’t hard if you take the time to research your writers past articles and writing work and make sure their style fits that of your own. Hiring oversea ghost writers can save you a lot of money if you’re lucky enough to find a highly skilled writer who can match your style.